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• !important Rule CSS Rule
The !important rule allows users and authors to alter the normal cascade. By default, the styles of the author will override the styles of the user. The !important rule gives the balance of power to the user. By specifing the !important rule, the user's precedence overrides the author and if both the user and the author specify !important for the same element/property, the user will win the precedence conflict. The !important rule is intended to improve accessibility and control over presentation for users with special requirements. The rule is positioned within the property declaration and after the property that is to have the cascade altered. The keyword "important" is preceded by an exclaimation mark to format the !important rule. The style sheets of the user agent are not intented for the !important rule.

• <absolute-size> CSS Value Group
The <absolute-size> value group is a value reference in the the property definition of the font-size property. The <absolute-size> value group expands to the following values: xx-small | x-small | small | medium | large | x-large | xx-large. This same property also reflects the <relative-size> value group option in it's property definition.

• <border-style> CSS Value Group
The <border-style> value group will specify the value set options for the line style of a box's border. The <border-style> value group expands to the following values: none | hidden | dotted | dashed | solid | double | groove | ridge | inset } outset. The <border-style> value group is a value reference in the property definition of the border style properties.

• <border-width> CSS Value Group
The <border-width> value group will specify the value set options for the line width of a box's border. The <border-width> value group expands to the following values: thin | medium | thick | <length>. The <border-width> value group is a value reference in the property definition of the border width properties. The relative values (thin, medium, thick) will be computed to absolute values and this computation is implementation specific.

• <color> CSS Data Type
The <color> is a reference to the CSS color data type. This data type reference is found in the value part of the property definition of the CSS specification. The CSS properties that can take a <color> data type value are: Note that the <color> data type and the color property are not the same thing. The dynamic pseudo-class selectors and the link pseudo-class selectors all take the color property which is an indirect use of the <color> data type. The value possibilities for the <color> data type are many and shown here:
  • a color keyword: body { background-color: white; } (see named colors)
  • a hexadecimal number: body { background-color: #ffffff; }
  • shorthand hex: body { background-color: #fff; }
  • RGB with decimal scale: body { background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); }
  • RGB with percentage scale: body { background-color: rgb(100%, 100%, 100%); }
All of the above options will render the background color of the body element the color white. CSS color capabilities have replaced HTML color attributes. HTML color attributes are no longer recommended and in fact have been deprecated.

• <counter> CSS Data Type
The <counter> is a reference for the CSS counter data type. This data type reference is found in the value part of the property definition of the CSS specification. The values of counters can only be referred to from the content property. The value of <counter> is an identifier that can be specified with two different functions: counter() or counters(). Counters are maintained by identifiers using the counter-increment and counter-reset properties.
p.section:before {content: "Section: " counter(section-counter) ". ";
counter-increment: section-counter +1;}

In the above example, the counter "section-counter" is referenced with the "counter" function (this causes the counter to be rendered on the page). The "content" property embodies the counter function. The "counter-increment" property will increment the same counter for each occurrence of all paragraphs with the class name of "section". To reset same counter:
p.section:before {counter-reset: section-counter 0;}

• <family-name> CSS Value Group
The <family-name> value group is a value reference in the the property definition of the font-family property. The <family-name> value group options are too numerous to show here. Family names for fonts are often platform dependent. This same property also reflects the <generic-family> value group option in it's property definition. Multiple font names can be provided (generic or family) for the font-family property where each font name is separated by a comma.

• <generic-family> CSS Value Group
The <generic-family> value group is a value reference in the the property definition of the font-family property. The <generic-family> value group expands to the following values: monospace | serif | sans-serif | cursive | fantasy. This same property also reflects the <family-name> value group option in it's property definition. Multiple font names can be provided (generic or family) for the font-family property where each font name is separated by a comma.

• <identifier> CSS Value Group
The <identifier> value group will specifies a named reference. The <identifier> value group must conform to the naming conventions specified for the CSS identifier.

• <integer> CSS Data Type
The <integer> data type represents a whole number. Values specified with the <integer> data type are expressed in decimal notation only. Whole numbers can be the digits of zero thru nine only (no decimal point). <integer> values may be preceded by a "-" or a "+" that designate the sign. The sign is optional for positive values and a "-0" is not considered a negative number. The CSS specification does not specify an upper or lower range limit for the <integer> value, but many property definitions will restrict values ranges.

• <length> CSS Data Type
The <length> data type is a <number> immediately followed by a unit identifying keyword. There are over 35 CSS properties that take the <length> Data Type. The unit identifiers are keywords and can be expressed in either relative terms or absolute terms.

The Keywords of the CSS <length> Data Type
CSS <length>
Keywords
Type of Unit Description Of Unit Keyword A Comparative value
pt Absolute Length points 1 point = 1/72 of an inch
1 point = 1/12 pica
pc picas 1 pica = 12 points
1 pica = 1/6 inch
in inches 1 inch = 72 points
1 inch = 6 pica
1 inch = 2.54 centimeters
cm centimeters 1 centimeter = 0.394 inch
1 centimeter = 10 millimeters
mm millimeters 1 millimeter = 0.0394 inches
1 millimeter = 1/10 centimeter
em Relative Length the font-size of the relative font n/a
ex the "x-height" of the relative font n/a
px pixels - relative to the viewing device n/a

The "em" unit is equal to the computed value of the "font-size" property of the element on which it is used. The "ex" unit is defined by the element's first available font. The "x-height" is so called because it is often equal to the height of the lowercase "x".

• <margin-width> CSS Value Group
The <margin-width> value group will specify the value set options for the width of a box's margin. The <margin-width> value group expands to the following values: auto | <length> | <percentage>. The <margin-width> value group is a value reference in the property definition of the margin width properties.

• <number> CSS Data Type
The <number> data type represents a real number. Values specified with the <number> data type are expressed in decimal notation only. Real numbers can be an <integer> or they can be be zero or more digits followed by a dot which is followed by one or more digits. <number> values may be preceded by a "-" or a "+" that designate the sign. The sign is optional for positive values and a "-0" is not considered a negative number. The CSS specification does not specify an upper or lower range limit for the <number> value, but many property definitions will restrict values ranges.

• <padding-width> CSS Value Group
The <padding-width> value group will specify the value set options for the width of a box's padding. The <padding-width> value group expands to the following values: <length> | <percentage>. The <padding-width> value group is a value reference in the property definition of the padding width properties.

• <percentage> CSS Data Type
The <percentage> data type represents a number of the <number> data type followed by the "%" symbol. All properties that take the <percentage> data type also take the <length> data type (over 35 CSS properties). Regarding scalability, a value of the <percentage> data type way have more desirable intended behavior that an absolute value of the <length> data type. The values of the <percentage> data type are always relative to another value.

• <relative-size> CSS Value Group
The <relative-size> value group is a value reference in the the property definition of the font-size property. The <relative-size> value group expands to the following values: smaller | larger . This same property also reflects the <absolute-size> value group option in it's property definition.

• <shape> CSS Value Group
The <shape> value group is a value reference in the the property definition of the clip property. The <shape> value group expands to the following values: rect(<top>, <right>, <bottom>, <left>). The notations: <top>, <right>, <bottom>, <left> all expand to the following values: auto | <length>.

• <string> CSS Data Type
The <string> data type represents a sequence of characters enclosed in quotes. Interpreter rules for handling white space are different for strings. Also, some non-typical characters (such as newlines) must be escaped. Strings can be written as either single or double quotes, however, like quotes within quotes must be escaped. CSS makes minimum usage of the <string> data type with only three properties that will accept it.

• <uri> CSS Data Type
The <uri> data type represents a Uniform Resource Identifier. With CSS, the functional notation used to specify URIs in property values is "url(...)", where a URL is coded inside the parenthesis. The syntax of an URL (Universal Resource Locator) value is also the syntax required of a <uri> data type value. Typically, the <uri> values are addresses on the Web that point to image files. The values can be relative references or absolute references. The CSS specification does not exclude URN or URL schemes other than HTTP from representing a value of the <uri> data type.















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