ISO-8859

Description

ISO-8859-1 is the character set of choice for English speaking users and Web designers. HTML documents must specify its character encoding. This information shows up in the HTTP "Content-Type" header. To establish the character set for your document, use the META tag in the document header information.

     two meta tags
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html" />
<meta http-equiv="charset" content="iso-8859-1" />
     OR (with one meta tag)
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=us-ascii" />


One META tag example refers to: Basic Latin (US-ASCII): {U+0000..U+007F} .

The other META tag example refers to: Latin-1 (ISO-8859-1): {U+0080..U+00FF} .


ISO-8859 is divided into the following parts:

ISO Name Common Names Languages Comments
ISO 8859-1 Latin-1 or
Western European
Basque
Catalan
Danish
Dutch
English
Faeroese
Finnish
French
German
Icelandic
Irish
Italian
Norwegian
Portuguese
Rhaeto-Romanic
Scottish
Spanish
Swedish
Eastern European Albanian
Afrikaans
Swahili
The most widely used part of ISO 8859. The missing Euro symbol and capital Y with umlaut are in the revised version ISO 8859-15. The corresponding IANA-approved character set ISO-8859-1 is the default encoding for legacy HTML documents and for documents transmitted via MIME messages (text/html).
ISO 8859-2 Latin-2 or
Central European
Polish
Croatian
Czech
Slovak
Slovenian
Hungarian
Supports those Central and Eastern European languages that use a Roman alphabet.
ISO 8859-3 Latin-3 or
Southern European
Turkish
Maltese
Esperanto
Largely superseded by ISO 8859-9 for Turkish and Unicode for Esperanto.
ISO 8859-4 Latin-4 or
Northern European
Estonian
Latvian
Lithuanian
Greenlandic
Sami
 
ISO 8859-5 Cyrillic Belarusian
Bulgarian
Macedonian
Russian
Serbian
Ukrainian
Covers mostly Slavic languages that use a Cyrillic alphabet.
ISO 8859-6 Arabic Arabic Covers the most common Arabic language characters.
ISO 8859-7 Greek Greek Covers the modern Greek language (monotonic orthography). Can also be used for Ancient Greek written without accents.
ISO 8859-8 Hebrew Hebrew Covers the modern Hebrew alphabet as used in Israel.
ISO 8859-9 Latin-5 or
Turkish
Turkish
Kurdish
Largely the same as ISO 8859-1, replacing the rarely used Icelandic letters with Turkish ones. It is also used for Kurdish.
ISO 8859-10 Latin-6 or
Nordic
Nordic Languages A rearrangement of Latin-4. Considered more useful for Nordic languages.
ISO 8859-11 Thai Thai  
ISO 8859-12 Latin-7
Celtic
Celtic In draft stage.
ISO 8859-13 Latin-7 or
Baltic Rim
Celtic Added some glyphs for Baltic languages which were missing from Latin-4 and Latin-6.
ISO 8859-14 Latin-8 or
Celtic
Gaelic
Breton
Mostly a rearrangement of the ISO 8859-12 draft. Covers Celtic languages such as Gaelic and the Breton language.
ISO 8859-15 Latin-9 See 8859-1 A revision of ISO 8859-1 that removes some little-used symbols, replacing them with the Euro symbol € and some forgotten French and Finnish letters.
ISO 8859-16 Latin-10 or
South-Eastern European
Albanian
Croatian
Hungarian
Italian
Polish
Romanian
Slovenian
Finnish
French
German
Irish Gaelic
Intended for Albanian, Croatian, Hungarian, Italian, Polish, Romanian and Slovenian, but also Finnish, French, German and Irish Gaelic (new orthography). The currency sign is replaced with the Euro symbol.

Top            

Rx4AJAX        About Us | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | 2008 This Site Built By PPThompson