A List of JavaScript Reserved Words



Navigation Aids -- This Page     Glossary Aids -- This Topic     Navigation Aids -- This Site








Comments About the Table

Although JS keywords are a subset of the JS reserved word set, the following list has excluded official JS keywords. We keep the official keyword word set in a separate list. Take this link for the keyword list.

Although JavaScript was not directly derived from the Java language, JavaScript reserve words do correspond to Java language keywords. JavaScript has not incorporated all of Java's OOP characteristics and many of the terms in the list reflect this state. Many other terms are explicit data types used to type values when they are declared and initialized. Remember that JavaScript is weakly typed and does not use the explicit data types.

We used the Java terms in Wikipedia to give a brief idea of the term usage.




List of Core JS Reserved Words




A List of JavaScript Reserved Words
Reserve Word Java Use of Word from Wikipedia
abstract Java: Used in a class declaration to specify that a class is not to be instantiated, but rather extended by other classes.
boolean Java: Refers to an expression or variable that can have only a true or false value.
byte Java: A keyword used to declare an expression, method return value, or variable of type byte.
char Java: A Java keyword used to declare an expression, method return value, or variable of type character.
class Java: A type that defines the implementation of a particular kind of object.
const Java: reserved without use.
debugger Java:
double Java: A 64-bit floating point value.
enum Java: A Java keyword used to declare an enumerated type.
export Java:
extends Java: Used in a class declaration to specify the super class.
final Java: Define an entity once that cannot be changed nor derived from later.
float Java: A 32-bit floating point value.
goto Java: reserved without use.
implements Java: Included in a class declaration to specify one or more interfaces that are implemented by the current class.
import Java: Used at the beginning of a source file to specify classes or entire Java packages.
int Java: A 32-bit integer value.
interface Java: Used to declare a special type of class that only contains abstract methods, constant (static final) fields and static interfaces.
long Java: A 64-bit integer value.
native Java: Used in method declarations to specify that the method is not implemented in the same Java source file, but rather in another language.
package Java: A group of types. Packages are declared with the package keyword.
private Java: An access modifier used in a method, field or inner class declaration. It signifies that the member can only be accessed by other elements of its class.
protected Java: An access modifier used in a method, field or inner class declaration. It signifies that the member can only be accessed by elements residing in its class, subclasses, or classes in the same package.
public Java: An access modifier used in a class, method or field declaration. It signifies that the class, method or variable can be accessed by elements residing in other classes or packages.
short Java: A 16-bit integer value.
static Java: Used to declare a field, method or inner class as a class field.
super Java: Used to access members of a class inherited by the class in which it appears. Allows a subclass to access overridden methods and hidden members of its superclass.
synchronized Java: Used in the declaration of an instance method or code block to acquire the mutex lock for an object while the current thread executes the code. Guarantees that at most one thread at a time operating on the same object executes that code.
throws Java: Used in method declarations to specify which exceptions are not handled within the method but rather passed to the next higher level of the program.
transient Java: Declares that an instance field is not part of the default serialized form of an object.
volatile Java: Used in field declarations to specify that the variable is modified asynchronously by concurrently running threads.


Other Browser Reserved Words

Most browsers will treat the following words as reserved when used in a JS context. If you are having a problem with a given identifier, it may be on this list. Notice the list contains BOM objects and JS object names without caps.

Top            

Rx4AJAX        About Us | Topic Index | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | 2008 This Site Built By PPThompson